10 Best Small Body and Mini Guitars

For those of you who’re looking for Small body or Mini Guitars; You’ve come to the right place!

It’s not always the best choice to jump into music with a high-end full-bodied guitar and that’s why some of the best Guitar manufacturers have provided us with a suitable alternative.

We’ve scoured the product lines and extracted out these great instruments to play a role in helping you achieve your Musical Dreams!

Best Small Body and Mini Guitars

Buy the Best Small Body and Mini Guitars in 2020

Taylor BT2 Baby Taylor Acoustic Guitar, Mahogany Top
  • 6-string Acoustic Guitar with Mahogany Top
  • Layered Sapele Back
  • Sides - Natural
  • Neck Width 1-11/16 inch

Parlor and wandering guitars have massively become an argued category in certain past years. Particularly when you look around for the mid-range designs away from the super affordable variety. 

Taylor, a brand known for top-tier acoustic guitars that require thousands of bucks, while making sure what is the high price game. Being the best travel guitars, lying in the mid-range affordable acoustic guitars, it gets a special place in our list.

Body And Neck

The neck is a Sapele design, highlighting a notable regulation rosewood fretboard. This is not a hand made apparatus, you can still see that through the expected Taylor build quality. Some will argue that BT2 is not an ‘authentic’ travel guitar. The idea for this is the fact that it doesn’t share the usual concert body shape, which most parlor guitars do. 

It’s slightly wider than the natural specimen. With a standard warship body, it provides versatility to its users, having retained a pretty compact size. Taylor went with a blend of a solid mahogany top and layered Sapele for the rest of the build. 

Hardware

In terms of essence, BT2 features nothing out of the regular. You get a clean and straight rosewood bridge outfitted with a remunerated seat made of Nubone. The nut is also made of the same material. Just like the tuning of machines. Hardware works very well. Also, make sure to keep it in secure and safe positions and do not push the guitar out of its aid band.

Sound

Precision, determination, and feeling come in plenty. It’s truly a Taylor, no matter how affordable it is. One of the best things about the Baby Taylor is the sound it brings to the counter. Not only is it pretty ambitious even when you compare it to its full-sized equivalents, but it catches the nature of that Taylor tone. Everything is tight, from the bottom of the wavelength range to its very top. Its dreadnought body repays well for its smaller size, that the difference between a full-sized one and BT2 is hard to notice unless you have involvement with acoustic guitars.

Summing Up

Build character is manifest no matter where you look first. It may or may not appear accurately straighten set up from the company and making these improvements can give you a real boost in the performance. If you are willing to sacrifice a small amount of versatility, BT2 will reward you with a production like of which you will seldom find elsewhere. At its prevailing rate, this guitar is a pure giveaway.

Yamaha C40 Classical Guitar Bundle with Gig Bag, Tuner, Strings, String Winder, Austin Bazaar Instructional DVD, and Polishing Cloth
  • Spruce top
  • Mahogany back and sides
  • Rosewood fingerboard
  • Nylon Strings
  • Bundle includes Gig Bag, Tuner, Instructional DVD, Strings, Pick Card, and Polishing Cloth

Martin is not a type of label you compare with affordable implements. The main structure of their hard work is never to negotiate quantity over quality by the tiring journey of almost two centenaries. However, times flies. Martin LXM is a somewhat odd travel guitar, which has a lot to offer but is pretty dubious at the same time. It’s among the best accomplishing travel guitars at the flash, which means a thing.

Body & Neck

The information for all the debate comes from the fact that Martin used mostly artificial materials when they designed the LXM. Instead of laminate wood, they’ve used Spruce and Mahogany patterned HPL – or High-Pressure Laminate. This reason solely turned the table against LXM, that also seems reasonable. However, Martin somehow managed to make this guitar work notwithstanding this. Simply it presented more than enough performance. It took some time before people even started contemplating the LXM as a viable option, but that time is long behind us.

Hardware

There’s a good quality rosewood bridge which sports a quality compensated white Tusq saddle. The nut is also made of white Tusq, which gives both of these elements just like the structure of the bone. Martin’s hardware is more than competent in remembering inflection as well as your tuning of choice. Even if you start going hard on those strings, chances are you won’t have to make any improvements. Though, we are looking at the same old arrangement. Speaking of sequences, this guitar comes with a pretty fair set that you won’t have to change anytime quickly.

Sound

LXM’s tone is the main reason why this guitar becomes so popular. Even with all the HPL, you still get that label Martin’s character. Guitar has quite a bit of variety to strive, despite referring to the compressed range, and the prediction is pretty good as well. One of the foremost things people worry about is the volume of travel guitars. In this case, you will find that Martin LXM mitigates that issue quite effortlessly. Sure, it’s not as loud as a full-sized dreadnought, but it’s far from reflecting shoal.

Summing up

By the end of the day, LXM is a great travel guitar being allowed at a decent price. The disgrace of using HPL for just about everything won’t go away anytime soon. This model has become moderately familiar by now. Still, many can’t explain this type of price for an instrument that is essentially an all-laminate design. If you can overlook all these past shortcomings, Martin LXM Little Martin might prove to be the perfect answer for your needs.

The right, the best innovative guitar designs, Luna Guitars is usually one of the first labels we mention. This is because Luna has a contribution to creating affordable one-of-a-kind guitars that require consideration. This Dragonfly 3/4-size acoustic – part of the celebrated Safari Series – is a fine representative of what the brand can do on a statement. But is it more than just a pretty face?

Body & Neck

With Luna’s classic mother-of-pearl ‘moon phases’ fret brands reaching the length of the fretboard.

There should be no vagueness over the name of this petite guitar as the soundhole is enhanced with an enameled trio of colorful dragonflies, which gives this machine a very unique look that is sure to clutch the eye of your viewers. 

Essentially, this dense guitar is a solid build. Although it is a Chinese-made stock model, the essence of the craftsmanship is worthy, and the elements – while laminates – also stand up to analysis. The body of the Dragonfly is crafted with layered mahogany, while the top is laminated spruce, all coated with a smooth satin finish.

The set neck is also satin-finished mahogany, with a hand-friendly C shape and an 18-fret hickory fretboard. This neck gives the guitar a 22” scale length, so it’s small and lightweight enough for travel and smaller players, although with a 1.69” nut expanse there is plenty of fretboard room to play with.

Hardware

The Dragonfly is furnished with several resolute elements that make it a strong little device. For instance, there is a set of die-cast chrome tuners on the headstock, with a GraphTech nut. The bridge-whist is walnut to match the fretboard, while there’s a dual-action truss rod that makes adjusting the neck pretty straightforward. The Dragonfly also comes with a basic and functional stamped gig bag – nothing special, but a handy addition, particularly for newcomers.

Sound

To be honest, the sound from such a small and affordable guitar is unbelievable. Sure, it’s not dreadnought in terms of projection, but it reaches surprisingly loud volumes, more than adequate for practice and small acoustic performances. Meantime, the tone is very abrupt and patient – leaning towards the positive picture of the spectrum, well balanced.

Summing-up

There should be no surprise to find out that we are impressed with the Dragonfly considering its features in our article on the best small guitars in the market, Luna has totaled yet another great statement model to its ever-growing selection. For miniature adults, novices or children, the Dragonfly is a very solid bargain under $200.

Yamaha FG830 Rosewood Acoustic Guitar with Knox Case,Stand,Strings,Tuner,Strap,Picks and DVD
  • FEATURES: Solid Spruce top with Rosewood back and sides and a scalloped bracing design
  • SCALLOPED BRACING: With its newly developed scalloped bracing design, the Yamaha FG830 Acoustic Guitar delivers richer harmonic overtones and boasts an ideal acoustic structure
  • GREAT DESIGN: Its woods is painstakingly dried and cured to perfection--while its beautiful finish is meticulously hand sprayed
  • ROSEWOOD: Rich overtones, long sustain, deep lows and bright highs are accredited to its Rosewood back and sides
  • INCLUDES: Scalloped Bracing for Loud and Strong Sound / Ideal for Playing Folk Music / Rosewood Back and Sides / Solid Spruce Top / Gloss Finish

This guitar offers a lot in such a petite body. You will love the experience if you are endured by a guitar player or a comprehensive beginner, master or disaster, this guitar will draw the best from you. It is just that fun to play. 

The Ibanez GRGM21BKN is a superb electric option out there for professionals with small hands. The friendly people who made this little, power-packed guitar did not surely put their efforts in vain. It looks so mean and yet cute that you could be in a dilemma whether to play it or just keep it as a pet.

Body and Neck

The body and neck are made of mahogany and maple, individually. Quality materials and 24 frets on a short neck present to this guitar’s sharp tone, and the price is quite inexpensive, as well. This is the first small-scale guitar that Ibanez built. It highlights the famous Ibanez inlays on the 22-inch long neck with 24 frets. 

At this size and quality-to-price ratio, this electric guitar is certainly among the best for novices and the best suitable choice for all players with small hands. Change a thing or two on this guitar for better quality services and you will be good to go. 

Sound

Yamaha FG830 doesn’t sound cheap. There’s a lot of that typical Dreadnought sound going on, but the core of its tone is pure quality. Rich projection coupled with a lot of overtones makes this Yamaha a force to reckon with this price range, for sure. 

Whether you’re a beginner, or someone looking for a better guitar to play instead of our tier-one acoustics, Yamaha FG830 will keep up with your specifications. Overall, we have to add that the sonic impact which is arguably the most important appearance of any guitar that has maintained to thoughtfully surprise us, and that is always a genuine thing.

Summing up

The FG 830 with the Hard tail bridge and a 22 inch 24 inch neck is notably fun to play and absolutely portable with its compact and light body. The playability is great for rookies who want to play with a great tone and want a high quality development. Compared to what it offers, this is definitely one of the more sensibly priced beginner instruments!

Donner DAG-1C Beginner Acoustic Guitar Full Size, 41" Cutaway Guitar Bundle with Gig Bag Tuner Capo Picks Strap String
  • Full-size 41 inch cutaway dreadnought body for full and vibrant tone, suited for all styles of music.
  • Right-hand design, spruce top and mahogany back and sides bring you richer and brighter sound.
  • 20 Brass Frets with Fret position Marks at 3th, 5th, 7th, 9th, 12th, 15th and 17th frets on neck and top of fingerboard
  • Comes with gig bag, guitar strap, guitar capo, strings, digital clip-on tuner , polishing cloth and guitar picks as gifts.
  • 30 Days Unconditional Money Back Guarantee Backed Up By Our Awesome Customer Support, you can rest assured to buy our products.

It’s time to take a look at another small guitar! This time it’s an impressive model that has made its way onto our chart for the best small guitars on the market – the GX18CE-NS, from the esteemed Japanese brand Takamine. 

There are loads to talk about, including the imperceptibly incongruous fact that it is a ‘mini-jumbo’ as well as an electro-acoustic model. Let’s plunge accurately into it.

Body and neck

Commencing with the fitness, the GX18CE-NS highlights Takamine’s distinctive NEX body, which is essentially a jumbo body scaled down to fit the dimensions of a 3/4-size guitar! Somewhat complicated, but rest confirmed that this makes for a suitable guitar to hold and play for smaller guitarists. For the record, it has a 22.5” scale length and a body length of around 18”.

This body is made of layered mahogany, along with a solid spruce top, with a cutaway on the treble side. This cutaway provides for great access right up the fretboard. This is a 21-fret wreath fretboard fixed onto a smooth satin-finished three-piece mahogany neck. With black body wrapper and a washed black and white soundhole rosette, the guitar feels complex and uncluttered. The fit and finish – as you may expect from a Takamine – is unique. It certainly feels worthy of taking out the public, which is a characteristic that’s augmented by the hardware.

Hardware

The GX18CE-NS emphasizes Takamine’s TP4T preamp practice, offering 3-band EQ bass, middle and treble sliders, volume and a built-in tuner on an easy-to-use control committee. A solid system that’s well worthy of filling in for production.

The rest of the device on this cute little guitar stands up to examination, with six closed chrome tuners atop the headstock a laurel bridge and two thong buttons on the body, making it easy to fix a strap to. More importantly, this guitar comes with an immeasurable Takamine-branded padded gig bag with backpack straps, which is a beneficial addition for traveling to and from lessons, concerts and further afield!

Sound

The GX18CE-NS has a pretty decent voice – not the heaviest, and lacks a bit of oomph in the bass, but punches above its weight in terms of prominence for a small guitar. Although note that it’s not the most forgiving for heavy strummers, and understanding in with a pick usually results in a cluttered sound. Still, there is no problem purchasing volume through the preamp and this system presents a good replication of the guitar’s natural tone, which is sweet, clear and bright.

Summing up

The GX18CE-NS is well worth catching if you are a smaller handed player requiring to perform live through an amp, without the inconvenience of using a mic. The same goes for players who want to travel with an electro-acoustic. The GX18CE-NS looks the part is fun to play and – while falls a little short in some aspects of the sound function – is still a pretty great guitar for the price.

Fender 0950816021-COMBO-DLX Acoustic Guitar Bundle with Gig Bag, Tuner, Strings, Strap, Picks, Austin Bazaar Instructional DVD, and Polishing Cloth
  • Everything you need to start playing straight out of the box
  • Full-size dreadnought body for full and vibrant tone, suited for all styles of music
  • 20-fret rosewood fingerboard with dot inlays
  • Rosewood bridge with compensated synthetic bone saddle
  • Laminated spruce top

The OG1FYS from Oscar Schmidt is a classy small-bodied acoustic guitar supporting a few winning characteristics. Scaled-down to 3/4 of the size of a regular acoustic, it’s a popular model with complete newcomers, as well as players with more petite hands, while it also makes a great acoustic guitar for youngsters. Let’s take a broader look to know all the ins and outs of this marvelous instrument.

Body and Neck

The OG1FYS features a 3/4-sized body, which is crafted from a laminated select spruce top with layered catalpa used all over the body. Also, we find a strong mahogany neck with a standard rosewood fretboard, highlighting 20 frets and dot inlays. Being a smaller scale, it’s a comfortable guitar if you have smaller hands. 

Aside from this, the craftsmanship – while still mass-produced – is very worthy, and meets the expectations we had from master guitar builders such as Oscar Schmidt. This is a fascinating combination, which looks great, especially when you have a variety of tones to choose from.

While the OG1FYS implies the yellow sunburst model, you can also find a red, blue, black and natural version of this compressed acoustic. Despite the color, with a high-quality gloss finish and handsome abalone wrapper and rosette, it’s safe to say that looks are definitely on this guitar’s side!

Hardware

Except for electronics we can take our attention towards the rest of the different domains and its features – such as the fact that the OG1FYS comes with a set of very strong chrome sealed tuners that are competent in keeping the guitar in tune for extended periods. The rosewood bridge is attractive also functional, while the adjustable truss rod in the neck is another useful addition for guaranteeing the right tension and intonation.

Sound

The sound is clear, the bass is quite strong and punchy, coordinated nicely with the trebles. It’s not as full or rich in tone as, say, the higher-end Baby Taylor or the Little Martin, but – at a fraction of their price – it’s hard to criticize. The OG1FYS surrenders a very solid sound, evocative of classic dreadnought models. Of course, it’s a tad closer than your standard full-sized acoustic, but it’s surprisingly full pending the diminished soundboard.

Summing-up

Offering good value for money, consolidating a handsome design, quality craftsmanship, and a satisfactory tone into a package that almost anybody can afford. That’s the reason we friendly gives it a big fat thumbs up.

One thing we all understand is – small guitars rock! Sure, they may not be the most powerful acoustics out there or the easiest to play, but they are so estimable – for everything from traveling the world to just having one nearby when motivation punches. Today we’re taking a look at this choice and reasons that why it always pops up in our charts?

A small guitar that demonstrates the recommended time and again is the affordable JR1 from Yamaha.

Body and Neck

Yamaha kept things simple when outlining the JR1, opting for their famous FG folk guitar shape with a compressed 3/4 size. This gives it a nice dividend in terms of being big sufficient to play adequately, but small enough to both keep around the house or travel with.  With the 3/4 scale, it can get a little uncomfortable for players with larger hands, but for most people – particularly beginners and smaller players – it’s a great size.

The steelyard was also in mind with the materials, as the JR1 features the classic pairing of spruce as the tonewood of choice on the top, with meranti making up the back and sides. On such an affordable guitar, these are both laminated. Overall, it’s a simple but sophisticated little acoustic, with the black body binding improving the balance. The neck is regulation – nothing special, but solid and content to move around, with a nato build, satin finish and a rosewood fretboard with 20 frets. It all feels well built for a mass-produced model, although – like many accounts acoustics – a sequence change and a good setup will move extra life into it from the off.

Hardware

Most people want to reduce the cost, that is why many affordable guitars often come with shady hardware.  However, the Yamaha JR1 offers suitable ingredients for the price. The body is outfitted with a simple rosewood bridge, emphasizing a remunerated plastic bone saddle and nut. The same uniformity is applied to the tuners – there’s an ordinary set of chrome open-geared tuning machines, which do the job.

Sound

If you require it to sound like a high-end Martin dreadnought you will, of course, be frustrated. Smaller acoustics traditionally have a weaker prominence and lack a good low-end response – an inevitable trade-off for their compact size. 

Still, the shape and build quality of the JR1 abandons a pretty good tone, with a bit more punch than some conventional concert-style travel guitars. It’s a little boxy but the trebles are crunchy and clean, while the mid-range is solid. Yes, it requires a bit of bass, but for its proposed uses, it’s not bad at all!

Summing-up

Those working on a tight budget who need a dense acoustic guitar for travel, or a myriad of other determinations, will find the JR1 from Yamaha to be a great solution. It’s well-made, allows a good tone and won’t ruin your bank account. After a series change and a proper setup, it’s hard to criticize the price.

Ovation AB24-4-KIT-1 Applause Balladeer Acoustic-Electric Cutaway Guitar with Chromacast Accessories, Natural
  • Spruce Top with Natural Finish
  • Electric Cutaway with Mid Depth bowl
  • Nato Neck with Satin Finish, Rosewood Fingerboard
  • OP-4BT Preamp w/ built in Guitar Tuner and EQ
  • Kit Includes: ChromaCast 80/20 Med-Light Guitar Strings, 4 Pick Sampler, 6' Cable, Nylon Guitar Strap, & Online Guitar Lesson

Dean is notable for its vast catalog of iconic rock-fueled electric guitars, but they also make a renowned mean travel acoustic – namely the Flight Series Bubinga, which is a petite 3/4 size model from their road-friendly Flight Series. The Bubinga model is fashionable, with a good dose of rock approach, and – at well under $200 – has a very attractive price. Let’s examine it!

Body and Neck

Unlike a few illustrations that follow our chart of the best travel acoustic guitars, the Flight Series Bubinga has all the style you could ask for and is a striking little apparatus. 

With a satin coating, the back and sides are made from mahogany, as is the neck. It highlights a comfortable C-shaped profile, with a rosewood fretboard and 19 frets (14 in the clear). As you may expect from Dean, there are some promotions, including the distinctive Dean winged headstock, a winning rosette, and some cool ‘flight’ fretboard inlays. As the price implies, it’s an entry-level guitar that was designed in China, but this doesn’t stop it making feel well-built and long-lasting for travel.

With a 3/4 size non-cutaway body and a 22” scale length, it emphasizes a top made from covered Bubinga – a bronze-colored tonewood with a refined grain, which is on full display with this guitar.

Hardware

With no sciences, this guitar isn’t racing in hardware, but all those elements that are part of it are not bad. On the headstock assemble six sealed chrome die-cast tuners, which are adequate – they felt a little loose. You will also find a solid rosewood bridge, strap pegs, a two-way truss rod, and a GraphTech nut and saddle. The guitar also appears with its basic gig bag, which is beneficial for carrying it.

Sound

For such a small guitar the sound is surprisingly resonant, with ample projection – just what you need for camping, hiking, hotel rooms, or wherever you end up taking this acoustic. Of course, it’s no match for a full-size dreadnought in terms of vibration or low end, but the Bubinga and mahogany fuse for a mellow, warm sound that’s pretty sweet.

Summing-up

For its lovely looks unparalleled, the Dean Flight Series Bubinga is worth the comparatively low asking price, but it sounds pretty good too. A 3/4 size guitar may take a little adapting to if you’ve only played full-size in the past, but its lightweight, compact nature makes it a wonderful travel attendant.

Ovation AB24-4-KIT-1 Applause Balladeer Acoustic-Electric Cutaway Guitar with Chromacast Accessories, Natural
  • Spruce Top with Natural Finish
  • Electric Cutaway with Mid Depth bowl
  • Nato Neck with Satin Finish, Rosewood Fingerboard
  • OP-4BT Preamp w/ built in Guitar Tuner and EQ
  • Kit Includes: ChromaCast 80/20 Med-Light Guitar Strings, 4 Pick Sampler, 6' Cable, Nylon Guitar Strap, & Online Guitar Lesson

Seldom we trip across a guitar that doesn’t fit into one single category and, today, that guitar is the Yamaha GL1. This tiny six-string guitar could fit into the travel category quite easily, also we have slotted it into our chart highlighting some of the best mini guitars. Yamaha market this instrument as ‘half guitar, half ukulele, 100% fun’, so let’s see how reliable they really are…

Body & Neck

The GL1 is not a toy. Despite the budget-friendly price tag and the point that it comes in at around 26” long, it’s a decent little instrument. It features the 17” scale of a tenor ukulele with a solid nato neck that has a nut width of around 1.88”. This neck, which features a snorkeling fretboard and 18 frets, is a little uncomfortable, but quite pleased when you get used to it.

As for tonewoods, the GL1 is an all- guitars laminated, with a top made from spruce, and back and sides made with meranti. This features a satin finish with advanced black body binding, finishing it off nicely. In addition to scale length, the body itself is also very similar to a tenor ukulele in size, so it should prove easy enough to hold for most players. 

Tuning-wise, it features both that of a guitar and ukulele, with an A-D-G-C-E-A tuning. Fancy a regular guitar with a capo sitting on the 5th fret, you have got the pitch of the GL1. Of course, you can tune this guitar down to standard guitar tuning allowing you to play along with songs and other guitars more adequately, yet the string anxiety will be a little looser when doing this.

Hardware

It’s an affordable mini guitar that you can’t expect too much in terms of hardware, yet what is included with the GL1 is guaranteed. Up top on the slotted headstock is a set of six open-geared tuning machines, while a snorkeling bridge adjusts things at the other end. 

The strings that come with the guitar are a little cheap and obscure, so change these when you have a chance. The GL1 also arrives with its gig bag, which is sufficient although not expressly protecting, so think about an ascent if you are traveling further afield.

Sound

It has the bright, happy and slightly tinny sound of a ukulele, while the prediction is on par with a tenor uke, as you may expect. It’s therefore great as a practice tool or for casual unplugged concerts, but it won’t fill a room unless you mix it up. When you consider the price and the size though, we can’t complain. While half guitar, half ukulele, it’s certainly more of the latter in terms of tone due to the body size and higher tuning. 

Summing-Up

For an apparatus that doesn’t fit into one specific category, it certainly ticks a lot of boxes. Overlooking the top two strings, you can play any ukulele chords, while utilizing all six strings turns it into a guitar, conceding you to practice both implements wherever you are. The GL1 isn’t a guitar that takes itself too precariously, yet Yamaha has ensured it is still well built and sounds decent, despite the small size, low price and overall feeling of fun.

Ovation AB24-4-KIT-1 Applause Balladeer Acoustic-Electric Cutaway Guitar with Chromacast Accessories, Natural
  • Spruce Top with Natural Finish
  • Electric Cutaway with Mid Depth bowl
  • Nato Neck with Satin Finish, Rosewood Fingerboard
  • OP-4BT Preamp w/ built in Guitar Tuner and EQ
  • Kit Includes: ChromaCast 80/20 Med-Light Guitar Strings, 4 Pick Sampler, 6' Cable, Nylon Guitar Strap, & Online Guitar Lesson

This classical mini acoustic guitar is designed for the comfort of beginners, teenagers and people with small hands. It has a layered spruce top and laminated basswood back and sides. This mini acoustic guitar features an ebonized bridge and fingerboard with 18 frets.

Also, it has stainless button tuners and a slim Maple neck. The ADM classical mini acoustic guitar has nylon strings and it weighs 3.79 pounds. 

Lastly, it features black ABS adhesive and has a synthetic bone saddle.

Conclusion

Well, we’ve given you a concise and specific list of the best acoustic guitar kits to help you make the best decision AND MUSIC!

Do let us know what you think about our list and if you have any suggestions in the comments! Have a great JAM!

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